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[New Study]Black Men at both ends of economic spectrum at risk for depression

Jobless African-American men might be at a greater risk of suffering from depression, new research shows. More surprising, at the other end of the income spectrum, African-American men making $80,000 and upward are also among those at higher risk.

For women, the picture is different: those in the $45,000 to $79,999 income bracket are less likely to report symptoms of depression compared to women with the least income, according to the results of a national survey of mental disorders among African-Americans.

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News

Rapper T.I. talks down suicidal jumper

Rapper T.I. helped police persuade a man not to jump off the roof of high-rise hotel roof in Midtown Atlanta on Wednesday afternoon, police said.

T.I., whose real name is Clifford Harris, talked to the man about how a person “can make it through anything,” Atlanta Police spokesman James Polite said.

“T.I. just happened to be in the right place at the right time,” Polite said.

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News

National Campaign for Mental Health Debuts at HBCU

Washington, D.C. — The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), working in collaboration with the Ad Council and the Stay Strong Foundation, announced today the launch of a national public service advertising (PSA) campaign designed to raise awareness of mental health problems among young adults in the African American community. The new PSAs were unveiled at a Black History Month event at Howard University this morning to coincide with the first annual HBCU National Mental Health Awareness Day. The launch was telecast to colleges and universities nationwide.

Mental illnesses, including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, are widespread in the U.S. and often misunderstood. According to SAMHSA, in 2008 there were an estimated 9.8 million adults aged 18 or older living with serious mental illness. Among adults, the prevalence of serious mental illness is highest in the 18 to 25 age group, yet this age group is also the least likely to receive services or counseling. In 2008, 6.0 percent of African Americans ages 18-25 had serious mental illness in the past year. Overall, only 58.7 percent of Americans with serious mental illness received care within the past 12 months and the percentage of African Americans receiving services is only 44.8 percent.

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Health + Wellness

Seeking Mental Guidance Doesn’t Make You Crazy

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