[Black History] A Brief History of Tennessee State University

Through successive stages, TSU has developed from a normal school for Negroes to its current status as a national university with students from 42 states and 45 countries. The present-day Tennessee State University exists as a result of the merger on July 1, 1979, of Tennessee State University and the former University of Tennessee at Nashville.

[Black History] A Brief History of Hampton University

“The thing to be done was clear: to train selected Negro youth who should go out and teach and lead their people first by example, by getting land and homes; to give them not a dollar that they could earn for themselves; to teach respect for labor, to replace stupid drudgery with skilled hands, and in this way to build up an industrial system for the sake not only of self-support and intelligent labor, but also for the sake of character.”

[Black History] A Brief History of Florida A & M University

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University was founded as the State Normal College for Colored Students, and on October 3, 1887, it began classes with fifteen students and two instructors. Today, FAMU, as it has become affectionately known, is the premiere school among historically black colleges and universities.

[Black History] A Brief History of Howard University

In November 1866, shortly after the end of the Civil War, members of the First Congregational Society of Washington considered establishing a theological seminary for the education of African-American clergymen. The new institution was named for General Oliver O. Howard, a Civil War hero who was both a founder of the University and, at the same time, commissioner of the Freedman’s Bureau.

HBCU alumna becomes the only African-American player to earn status on the LPGA Tour

The 6’1” Averyhardt recorded nine wins in collegiate competition while a student at Jackson State University, a historically black university in Jackson, Miss., where she graduated in 2008 with a degree in accounting.

Roundup Radio: Black Leadership, Integration, and HBCUs

Lavell Flamon, Educator Maurice Dolberry, and Grammy Award winning rapper David Banner discuss Black Leadership, the impact of Integration, and touch on the topic of HBCUs.

HU President Dr. William R. Harvey Responds to WSJ Article Criticizing HBCUs

learly, historically black colleges and universities do not need “a makeover” or “a new mission”. What is needed are major publications, such as the Wall Street Journal to conduct solid and sincere research so it can better appreciate the value and contributions HBCUs make.