Talib Kweli on the Legacy of Dr. King and Malcolm X

“Without trying to disrespect anybody’s beliefs, [Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X] are our prophets for our generation,” Kweli said. “In the scope of history, they haven’t been gone for too long. Someone asked me ‘Do you think the spirit of King is in hip-hop?’ And if you think about it, hip-hop wouldn’t exist […]

[Black History] A Brief History of Grambling State University

Grambling State University opened on November 1, 1901 as the Colored Industrial and Agricultural School. In 1946, the school became Grambling College, named after P.G. Grambling, the white sawmill owner who had donated the parcel of land where the school was constructed.

[Black History] A Brief History of Morehouse College

In 1867, two years after the Civil War ended, Augusta Institute was established in the basement of Springfield Baptist Church in Augusta, Ga. Upon the death of the founder in 1913, Atlanta Baptist College was named Morehouse College in honor of Henry L. Morehouse

[Black History] A Brief History of Southern University

Southern University and A&M College had its beginning in New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1880 when a group of Black politicians, led by former U.S. Senator P.B.S. Pinchback, T.T. Allain, and Henry Demas petitioned the State Constitutional Convention to establish a school of higher learning for “colored” people.

[Black History] A Brief History of Tennessee State University

Through successive stages, TSU has developed from a normal school for Negroes to its current status as a national university with students from 42 states and 45 countries. The present-day Tennessee State University exists as a result of the merger on July 1, 1979, of Tennessee State University and the former University of Tennessee at Nashville.